Arizona High School Football Player Dies from Traumatic Brain Injury

High School Football Player in Arizona Dies Due to Traumatic Brain Injury Sustained During Game

traumatic brain injuryA high school football player for Hopi High School, in Keams Canyon on the northeastern Hopi reservation in Arizona, died around November 9th due to a traumatic brain injury sustained during a game.

Charles Youvella reportedly died over the weekend, according to the Arizona Interscholastic Association on Monday, November 10th. Youvella was a senior.

The Hopi High School team played Arizona Lutheran a few days before, losing badly, 60-6. Youvella reportedly scored the team’s only touchdown during the game. Later, he was hospitalized for a traumatic brain injury.

Youvella’s father, Wallace, is on the executive board for the AIA. He said that his son died with his family by his side.

The AIA reports that it will set up an account to help defray the costs of hospitalization for the Youvella family.

5 Ways to Prevent Student Athlete Traumatic Brain Injury

1: Learn everything you can about traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury is complicated, subtle, and difficult to recognize — especially on the part of the children who might have gotten one.  If you can’t prevent traumatic brain injury, you can at least prevent complications.

Familiarize yourself with the symptoms, which can include: headache, dizziness, nausea, depression, memory loss, and insomnia.  Traumatic brain injury can be caused in any head-impact — not just hard football helmet-to-helmet hits.  Even non-athletes can get injured — kids with ADHD  and people with previous traumatic brain injury are especially at risk.

2: Check protective equipment

Make sure athletes have highly-rated equipment that is in good shape.  Safe helmets are key to preventing bad head injuries.  There are even helmets for sports that don’t normally have them — soccer and field hockey, for example.  Make sure it fits.

3: Training

Some bad habits in athletics can lead to higher risk for traumatic brain injury, make sure athletes are trained on proper procedure.  Strength training can go a long way too.  Make sure tackling technique or heading the ball techniques are taught to novices.

4: Pay attention as a parent

Coaches and trainers are excellent resources, but no one knows your child better than you do, it is likely that you will see unusual performance or behavior before anyone else does.

5: Know what you’ll do if there is a traumatic brain injur

Before the season begins, make sure your child gets a baseline test to establish their cognitive functioning.  This will ensure easier diagnosis of traumatic brain injury in the future.  If your child has a traumatic brain injury, know which doctor you will take them to.

Traumatic Brain Injury Could Lead to Personal Injury Case

If your child has received a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion because of negligence on the part of the school or athletic league, you may have a personal injury case. The attorneys at Strom Law, LLC can help you. We offer free consultations to discuss the facts of your case, so contact us today. 803.252.4800.

About Pete Strom

Defending criminal charges including drug crimes, DUI, CDV, mail fraud, wire fraud, bank fraud, computer crimes, money laundering, and juvenile crimes, Pete also handles Federal and State investigations. Representing individuals in Civil Matters including Class Actions, Personal Injury, Qui Tam Actions, Defective Products, Nursing Home Neglect, and Professional Licensing Defense cases. Joseph Preston “Pete” Strom, Jr., the managing partner at Strom Law Firm, L.L.C., has been fighting for justice since 1984.

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