Alexa

Defective Products Lawyers

Defective Products Liability Lawsuits

If you or your child has been injured or damaged as a result of a defective product, food, or toy, you may have a defective products claim against the product manufacturer or distributor.  Every year, thousands of consumers sustain serious injuries from defective products. Many of these injuries could be avoided if the manufacturers or distributors of these products took additional steps to ensure consumer safety. Defective products that commonly cause injuries include medical devices, pharmaceutical products, and other defective products such as toys, cars and automotive parts.

What makes a product defective?

  • Defective manufacturing
  • Inadequate testing
  • Food-borne pathogens
  • Design defects
  • Marketing Misrepresentation

The Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. handles all kinds of defective products lawsuits and has experience determining all potentially responsible parties, and proving that the defective product caused your injuries. Give us a call today for a free consultation.

Our most common cases include:

Defective Products Compensation

Consumers that have been harmed by defective products such as drugs, medical devices, or other products, may be eligible to receive legal remedies. Such legal remedies, or damages, may include compensation for medical expenses, lost wages, loss of physical capacity, pain, suffering, and mental anguish. Punitive damages are also available in many jurisdictions to punish defendants in those cases involving particularly egregious conduct which demonstrates a reckless or wanton disregard for the safety of the public.

If you work at a company that manufactures or markets products, such as pharmaceuticals, medical devices, or any other company that is regulated by the government, and you believe the products are defective, you could have a valid qui tam claim.

Steps to Take After You Learn of a Defective Product

To protect yourself and your family, it’s important to know what products have been recalled because they are defective or unsafe. Federal agencies such as the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and the CPSC (U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission) frequently issue recalls for medical devices, drugs, and products that may be harmful to consumers.

If you have been injured by a defective product, there are important steps you should take.   First, ensure that the product is not lost or destroyed.  If you do not have access to the product, contact us immediately because we will take the steps necessary to preserve the product before it’s destroyed.

Under products liability law, it’s the injured party’s burden to prove that the product was defective. Therefore, it is important that the product be inspected by one or more qualified experts to determine the exact nature of the defect and whether that defect caused the harm suffered. If the product is not recovered, the customer may be left with no proof that the product was defective.

Dangerous, defective, improperly labeled or improperly used products and food are everywhere.

Defective Product Defects

Defective and dangerous products, marketing defects, and manufacturing defects have the ability to cause serious injuries, permanent disabilities, and potentially death. Types of defective products may include consumer products, defective automobiles, defective medical products, and dangerous drugs.Every year, thousands of consumers sustain serious injuries from common household products that are defective. These goods usually seem harmless until an injury occurs. Some examples of defective or unsafe consumer products include: automobiles and automotive products, toys and children’s products,

Manufacturing Flaw of Defect

First, a product can be unreasonably dangerous because of a manufacturing defect. A manufacturing defect occurs when the manufacturer fails to make the product in accordance with plans and specifications set forth for the product. The design of the product might be flawless, but, one or more of the actual items is dangerously defective because it was made improperly. The plaintiff must also prove that the manufacturing defect caused the injury. In other words, the defect must have existed when the product left the manufacturer’s hands and the product was unaltered when it cause the injury.

Design Flaw or Defect

Second, a product can be unreasonably dangerous because of a design defect. A design defect occurs when the entire line of products produced by the manufacturer is unreasonably dangerous. Generally, to determine whether the product is unreasonably dangerous, states use some variation of a balancing test. The balancing test weighs the utility of the product against the danger that it poses. In most cases, the plaintiff will offer proof of a “safer alternative design” that the manufacturer could have used which would have prevented the injury. The court will use the balancing test to weigh the feasibility of a “safer alternative design”, the cost and availability of safety features and the extent such modifications would diminish the product’s effectiveness.

Inadequate Instructions or Warnings

Finally, a product can be rendered unreasonably dangerous because of inadequate instructions or warnings. Inadequate instructions or warnings occur when the manufacturer or distributor of the product does not provide the consumer or user with sufficient information regarding the danger involved in operating, using, maintaining or cleaning the product. In order for instructions or warnings to be adequate, they must be conspicuous and completely warn the customer of the degree of risk involved in failing to abide by the warnings or instructions. The lack of adequate instructions or warnings may render a product defective even though the product was not otherwise flawed. The warnings may also be required to be in more than one language if it is reasonably foreseeable that people will use the products who do not speak English.

In cases involving inadequate warnings, the presumption is that if the adequate warning had been given then the consumer would have read and heeded the warning. This presumption can only be rebutted with evidence that the consumer had some personal characteristic which would have cause the consumer not to have heeded any warning, even if an adequate warning had been provided.

You May Be Entitled to Compensation If You Suffered Injury or Death from a Defective Product

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured or died as a result of a defective product, food, toy, or vehicle, contact the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. today for a free consultation with one of our dangerous products and South Carolina wrongful death attorneys today to discuss the facts of your case.

Trackbacks

  1. […] While many coffee or soda drinkers are familiar with the regular side effects of too much caffeine, including headaches, dehydration, and “the jitters” or shaking and twitching, caffeine in larger doses can cause other problems, including heart palpitations and murmurs, erratic heartbeat, and seizures. These extreme side effects can lead to death. […]

  2. […] California woman filed a product liability lawsuit after she was badly burned by an electronic cigarette. And on Wednesday, the jury ruled in her […]

  3. […] has suffered the sort of emotional pain that many personal injury plaintiffs go through – a defective product caused him great physical injury, leading him to hospitalization, days away from work and in a […]

  4. […] recall is reminiscent of the GM key ignition vehicle recall that plagued GM recently.  In that recall, the company acknowledged that the key ignition […]

  5. […] you have experienced a problem with a defective product in your automobile, especially if a defective part has led to an auto accident or personal […]

  6. […] million to 29 states, and American Samoa, as part of a settlement regarding complications with vehicle recall notices in […]

  7. […] 2009 and 2010, Toyota issued three massive vehicle recalls for more than 10 million vehicles after repeated reports of unintended acceleration that led to […]

BestLawyers.comAVBetter Business Bureau