“Prom Promise” To Help End Juvenile DUI

“Prom Promise” Demonstration of Juvenile DUI Accident at High School Highlights Dangers

Jackson County first responders created a demonstration of a car accident at a local high school as part of Alabama’s “Prom Promise” initiative, which aims to prevent juvenile DUI during the party-heavy prom season this spring.

The demonstration is a faked car accident, but the set-up involves real first responders like the fire department and the police department, as well as students in the high school’s acting class. Chief Patrick Allen hopes that the demonstration will show the real potential tragedy of juvenile DUI.

“We’ve got a wreck scene set up for the kids, for Prom Promise, to show how easy it is to get yourself killed drinking and driving,” Chief Allen said.

The demonstration involved a set-up car accident, injuries, treatment from first responders, and students playing victims and crying for help. The group involved in “Prom Promise” hopes the demonstration of real-life potential tragedy caused by juvenile DUI, which is illegal in all states in the US, will help prevent too many such accidents during prom season.

“So they look at it and they start thinking about, ‘Hey that’s my friend out there that’s laying out there dead,'” explained Jason Hepler, Hollywood Police Chief. “Even though it’s actually pretend the actually see the dangers of what could happen if they drink and drive.”

Nationally, there are about 10.8 million underage drinkers in the US. That type of alcohol abuse kills 4,700 people per year. Because of the temptation to look cool or be part of the party, underage drinkers consume more drinks at a given event than adult drinkers.

The statistics for juvenile DUI incidents are worse. About 1 in 5 high school students report that they have been driven by a drunk driver. About 8.2% of high school students report driving after drinking, one or more times.

“The look in the kids eyes, how real it looks. I think it’s getting to them, what drinking and driving will really do to somebody, how it can take their life away,” Chief Allen says.

South Carolina has a Zero Tolerance Policy for DUI and Underage Drinking

Not only does the state of South Carolina have tough DUI laws for adults, but the state has a zero tolerance policy for underage drinking and juvenile DUI. Any person under the age of 21 caught with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.02 or higher can be charged with DUI.

The Strom Law Firm Defends Juveniles Charged with DUI

Criminal charges can seriously limit your future if you are a juvenile. Any charges which might be misdemeanors or minor infractions carry much more serious penalties for those who are under the age of 21, and could mean you do not qualify for scholarships, colleges will turn you down, you must take time away from school which could put your graduation at risk, and you could face limited job prospects in the future. Do not let an underage DUI charge keep you down. The DUI and juvenile crimes attorneys at the Strom Law Firm offer a free, confidential consultation to discuss the facts of your case. 803.252.4800

About Pete Strom

Defending criminal charges including drug crimes, DUI, CDV, mail fraud, wire fraud, bank fraud, computer crimes, money laundering, and juvenile crimes, Pete also handles Federal and State investigations. Representing individuals in Civil Matters including Class Actions, Personal Injury, Qui Tam Actions, Defective Products, Nursing Home Neglect, and Professional Licensing Defense cases. Joseph Preston “Pete” Strom, Jr., the managing partner at Strom Law Firm, L.L.C., has been fighting for justice since 1984.

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